The Prayer of Australia’s Parliament

Apparently, this prayer is said in Australia’s Parliament.  How long that will continue I cannot say:

“Almighty God, we humbly beseech Thee to vouchsafe Thy special blessing upon this Parliament, and that Thou wouldst be pleased to direct and prosper the work of Thy servants to the advancement of Thy glory, and to the true welfare of the people of Australia.”

Source: https://puritanboard.com/threads/prts-the-kjv.92852/, Comment 15

Only Christianity Can Save The West

Michael Savage, a non-Christian, understands that destroying Christianity will destroy the West.  At approximately 12:32 in the below video (Savage Nation, June 22, 2017):

“Unless there is a reversion to the basic tenets of Christianity, the morality, and the ethics of Christianity, this country is doomed, in plain English.”

Arguably, it isn’t a reversion to a generic Christianity that will save the West, but a return to the historic biblical Protestantism which helped build the West in the first place.  The first step would be for professing Protestants to actually become Protestant again.

What is a Worldview?

Ligonier Ministries:

Abortion. Euthanasia. Pornography. Same-sex marriage. Transgender rights. Embryonic research. Genetic enhancement. Christians surveying the cultural landscape in the West have a clear sense that things are headed in a destructive direction. While most believers can easily identify the symptoms of decline, few feel competent to diagnose and address the root causes. There are many complex factors behind these developments, but one invaluable tool for better understanding and engaging with our culture is the concept of worldview. The sociological quakes and moral fissures we observe in our day are largely due to what we might call “cultural plate tectonics”: shifts in underlying worldviews and the collisions between them.

What is a worldview? As the word itself suggests, a worldview is an overall view of the world. It’s not a physical view of the world, but rather a philosophical view, an all-encompassing perspective on everything that exists and matters to us.

A person’s worldview represents his most fundamental beliefs and assumptions about the universe he inhabits. It reflects how he would answer all the “big questions” of human existence: fundamental questions about who and what we are, where we came from, why we’re here, where (if anywhere) we’re headed, the meaning and purpose of life, the nature of the afterlife, and what counts as a good life here and now. Few people think through these issues in any depth, and fewer still have firm answers to such questions, but a person’s worldview will at least incline him toward certain kinds of answers and away from others.

Worldviews shape and inform our experiences of the world around us. Like spectacles with colored lenses, they affect what we see and how we see it. Depending on the “color” of the lenses, some things may be seen more easily, or conversely, they may be de-emphasized or distorted—indeed, some things may not be seen at all.

Worldviews also largely determine people’s opinions on matters of ethics and politics. What a person thinks about abortion, euthanasia, same-sex relationships, environmental ethics, economic policy, public education, and so on will depend on his underlying worldview more than anything else.

As such, worldviews play a central and defining role in our lives. They shape what we believe and what we’re willing to believe, how we interpret our experiences, how we behave in response to those experiences, and how we relate to others. Our thoughts and our actions are conditioned by our worldviews.

Worldviews operate at both the individual level and the societal level. Rarely will two people have exactly the same worldview, but they may share the same basic type of worldview. Moreover, within any society, certain worldview types will be represented more prominently than others, and will therefore exert greater influence on the culture of that society. Western civilization since around the fourth century has been dominated by a Christian worldview, even though there have been individuals and groups who have challenged it. But in the last couple of centuries, for reasons ranging from the technological to the theological, the Christian worldview has lost its dominance, and competing worldviews have become far more prominent. These non-Christian worldviews include:

  • Naturalism: there is no God; humans are just highly evolved animals; the universe is a closed physical system.
  • Postmodernism: there are no objective truths and moral standards; “reality” is ultimately a human social construction.
  • Pantheism: God is the totality of reality; thus, we are all divine by nature.
  • Pluralism: the different world religions represent equally valid perspectives on the ultimate reality; there are many valid paths to salvation.
  • Islam: there is only one God, and He has no son; God has revealed His will for all people through His final prophet, Muhammad, and His eternal word, the Qur’an.
  • Moralistic therapeutic deism: God just wants us to be happy and nice to other people; He intervenes in our affairs only when we call on Him to help us out.

Each of these worldviews has profound implications for how people think about themselves, what behaviors they consider right or wrong, and how they orient their lives. It is therefore crucial that Christians be able to engage with unbelief at the worldview level. Christians need to understand not only what it means to have a biblical worldview, but also why they should hold fast to that worldview and apply it to all of life. They should be able to identify the major non-Christian worldviews that vie for dominance in our society, to understand where they fundamentally differ from the Christian worldview, and to make a well-reasoned case that the Christian worldview alone is true, good, and beautiful.

The challenge is greater than ever. But we shouldn’t be discouraged, because the opportunities and resources available to us are also greater now than they have ever been. In the last half-century or so there has been a remarkable renaissance in Christian philosophy and apologetics, much of which has focused on developing and defending a biblical worldview. Whatever God calls His people to do, He equips them to do (see Eph. 4:11-12Heb. 13:20-21). The problem is not that the church is under-equipped, but that she has yet to make full use of what Christ has provided for her.

This post was originally published in Tabletalk magazine. This article is used with permission.

HT: http://theaquilareport.com/what-is-a-worldview/

Christian Duty Under Wicked Rule

Samuel B. Wylie,
Two Sons of Oil, pp. 63-71

1. It is our duty to mourn before God over all the prevailing abominations. This is one of the characters of those who are marked with the broad seal of the Holy Ghost, Ezek, ix. 4. And the Lord said, “Go through the midst of the city, through the midst of Jerusalem, and set a mark upon the foreheads of the men that sigh and cry for all the abominations that are done in the midst thereof.” We ought, also, to confess and mourn over our own sins, which, no doubt, contribute their share to the procuring and continuance of those evils.

2. We ought to pray for their reformation with earnestness at a throne of grace. 1st Tim. ii. 1, we are commanded to make prayer and supplications for all men; and, Jer. xxix. 7, the captives in Babylon are commanded to “pray for the peace of the city, and cry to the Lord for it, that in its peace they might have peace.” This prayer, however, ought not to recognise them in their official capacity; for this would be saying, Amen, to the immorality of the constitution on which they stand. 2d John, 10th and 11th verses, we are commanded, “not to receive impostors into our houses, or bid them God speed, for he that biddeth them God speed, is partaker of their evil deeds.” This must respect them as deceivers, and not as men, for we are commanded to “pray for all men.” 2d Tim. ii. 1.

3. We ought to use every lawful endeavour to promote reformation, such as rational arguments, and decent remonstrances :…

Read more: https://purelypresbyterian.com/2017/04/18/the-duty-of-christians-under-wicked-rule/

Related: http://barbwire.com/2017/06/01/americas-confession-sin/

Hawaii’s Christian Past

“Hawaii was a Christian nation before it became part of the United States. From the first part of the first Constitution proclaimed by King Kamehameha III in 1840:

Were America’s Founding Fathers Christian?

No, as evidenced by the following:

One of the more interesting chapels we had at Master’s was done by one of the history professors about the religious beliefs of some of the Founding Fathers (a subject on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation). He argued that while they weren’t necessarily strict deists, they were far from Christian, and they tended to use generic God-words rather than actually recognising the true God. He dubbed them theistic rationalists. They also believed that religion in general was a good idea because it gave people a moral foundation that without society would fall apart. This is the list he gave us:

John Adams

In his diary in February 1786, he stated that the deity of Christ and the atonement are absurdities.
In 1813, in a letter to Jefferson, he denied the Trinity.
In September of 1813, in a letter to Jefferson, he said that were he on Mt. Sinai with Moses, faced with the Shekinah with God and told by God Himself that the trinity is a true doctrine, he would affirm it only to save his life, but in his heart of hearts he would find it impossible to believe.
In December of 1813, in a letter to Jefferson, he stated that the Bible cannot supersede philosophy.
In 1814, in a letter to Jefferson, he wrote that the Fall is either allegorical or bad tradition.
In 1807, in a letter to Benjamin Rush, he wrote that he reveres the Bible insofar as it is a republican document.
In December of 1813, in a letter to Jefferson, he wrote that all of mankind will find salvation through works.
In 1820, he wrote to Samuel Miller that all good men are Christians.

Thomas Jefferson

In 1820, he wrote to Jared Sparks that the trinity is merely polytheism.
In 1821, he wrote to Thomas Pickering that the trinity is incomprehensible.
In 1822, he wrote to James Smith that the trinity is hocus-pocus phantasm.
In 1823, he wrote to John Adams that the virgin birth is like Greek myth.
In 1803, he wrote to Benjamin Rush that he likes Jesus’ doctrines, but denies his deity.
In 1787, he wrote to Peter Carr that the NT authors only pretended to inspiration.
In 1820, he wrote to William Short that Paul corrupted Christianity.
In 1814, he wrote to Miles King that salvation is universal — all paths lead to Heaven.
In 1813, he wrote to William Camby that works gain entrance to Heaven.

B. Franklin

In 1790, he wrote to F. Stiles that he has never studied the deity of Christ, but he doubts it, and soon enough he will find out for certain anyway, so he had no intention of doing so. He also wrote that he has never opposed any doctrines of any of the churches in Philadelphia, giving money to them all, and so that is enough.

George Washington

He never claimed Christianity.
On March 3, 1779, he was confronted by a group to profess Christianity — he refused.
He never took communion, and after being chastised for this from the pulpit, he ceased to attend church on Sacrament Sundays.
In 1787, he wrote to LaFayette that he indulges the professors of Christianity, that their road will get them to Heaven — he only ever wrote of Christianity in the third person.
In 20,000 documents of Washington’s, there is only one mention of Christ, and that not in his handwriting but his clerk’s (who wrote his speeches for him, and he often did mention Christ, but Washington crossed it out and replaced it with a generic God-term).
Isaac Potts, the man who was to have seen Washington on his knees in prayer in Valley Forge was no where near Valley Forge at that time (by his own admission) — this was a story created by Parson Weams, the man who wrote Washington’s hagiography.
Bishop White said there was never any evidence for Washington being a Christian.
The Reverend Samuel Miller asked how a Christian could never mention Christ or the hope within him.
George Washington was a proud Freemason — his favourite portrait of himself was of him in his masonic regalia. He laid the capstone of D.C. with a masonic trowel while wearing masonic regalia. He was the master of the Alexandrian Lodge. Freemasonry is not in any way, shape, or form compatible with Christianity — there is no way to be both.

The Declaration of Independence appeals to nature and reason and speaks in general and vague terms. The Constitution is godless (a complaint of the Anti-Federalists). The Convention never mentioned the Bible. The Federalist Papers used God-words.

John Adams’ and Thomas Jefferson’s primary religious influence was Joseph Priestly — who wrote a book about the corruptions of Christianity (i.e., the atonement, deity of Christ, etc.). When they did write of Jesus, they never called him Jesus Christ, but only ever Jesus of Nazareth — to emphasise his humanity and their lack of belief in his deity.”

Source: https://puritanboard.com/threads/the-united-states-of-america.47284/page-2, Comment 33

To Trifle With God Is To Invite Disaster

Rev. Mark H. Creech on God’s judgment of the Babylonians by the Persians:

The truths of this story are self-evident for our own time.

To trifle with God, who is sovereign over the nations, is to invite disaster…

Dr. George Sweeting, former chancellor of Moody Bible Institute has written, “No nation can rise above the faith and character of its individual citizens. America has a choice to make. Either we turn back by faith in Jesus Christ, or we will join the fate of other long-forgotten nations.”